African Regional Conference on Localisation Aid: Concerted Consolidated efforts needed

African Regional Conference on Localisation Aid: Concerted Consolidated efforts needed 

“The will”

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Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 15&16 July 2019

In the recent past, there has been growing recognition for the need to empower local communities and organizations to effectively respond to humanitarian needs. Nevertheless, significant portions of humanitarian financing remains channeled to International NGOs leaving local communities and organizations inadequately funded. Despite commitments to reinforce local and national capacities, data reported to UN Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) Financial   Tracking Service shows that only 2% of international humanitarian assistance in 2016 went directly to local 

Is more money being channelled directly to local actors or is localisation a new convenient funding window benefiting mainly INGOs? Participant

50% of the 25% channelled to local actors should go to women led organisations. Women are requesting for 50/50 participation and benefit. Conference Participant

and national responders, and national and local Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) received just 0.3% directly.

At the World Humanitarian Summit, held in May 2016 UN Secretary General laid out his vision in his report One Humanity: Shared Responsibility and its annex, the Agenda for Humanity and called upon the international community to put local response at the heart of humanitarian efforts. The summit also triggered Charter for Change that sets a specific target of 20% of humanitarian funding to be passed to southern-based NGOs by May 2018. The Grand Bargain (GB), another major outcome of the summit, seeks to make emergency aid finance more efficient and effective, committing to “a global, aggregated target of at Least 25% of humanitarian funding to local and national responders as directly as possible” and principled humanitarian action as local as possible and as international as necessary. 

How do we manage the challenge of perceived competition, political huddles or scramble for resources at national level? These are realities on the ground. Participant

 Since 2016, significant efforts have been undertaken at the international, national and local level by the Grand Bargain signatories to achieve the goal of providing more support and funding tools for local and national responders (Workstream 2) to realise the Grand Bargain commitments, however this seems to have fallen on unprepared ground hence taking long to germinate most especially by local actors.

As such; as co-conveners of the localization workstream (a network of major donors, UN agencies, international non-governmental organizations and the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement), on 15-16 July 2019, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and the Government of Switzerland convened over 100 delegates from all over Africa to discuss on how the already existing efforts can be harmonized to bring about more significant changes at system, strategic and operational levels. 

Addressing the participants, the Head of the AU’s Division on Humanitarian Affairs, Refugees and Displaced Persons, in the department of Political Affairs, Amb. Olabisi Dare highlighted that, localization of aid should aim at increasing the quantum of funding that reaches national actors including Community actors; and more importantly enhance the capacity development of the national and Community actors to effectively govern overall humanitarian assistance. 

How do we ensure accountability of donors to commitments? How do we hold them accountable? Conference participant

Eve Amez-Droz, Deputy Head of International Cooperation, Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation in Ethiopia, said: “A localised approach to aid has many benefits. It improves local ownership and awareness of aid, promotes its relevance, and allows for a more inclusive response, integrating the participation of affected people.” 

What are the implications on the Humanitarian Principles of achieving a spirited localisation agenda? Participant

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Among the agreed on key priorities to accelerate the localization agenda in Africa included greater and meaningful representation of local actors in humanitarian decision making bodies, more investment in local institutional capacities to ensure systems, mechanisms and necessary policies are in place to harness accountability and transparency; and more targeted humanitarian support for women-led organizations to address issues pertaining women holistically such as women leadership, economic empowerment and norm changes due to changes in contexts. They also highlighted the need for governments to support the development of their own civil society responders; to develop domestic laws and policies to facilitate and regulate international response; and to seize the opportunity of the African Union’s new Humanitarian Agency which will soon be established.

By Clare Kyasiimire

Focal Person, Humanitarian Platform

Civil Society Organisations in Uganda to partner with the Government to respond to COVID 19

Hosting the Humanitarian Platform for Local and National Organisations in Uganda, Uganda National NGO Forum represents civil society on the National Covid 19 Technical taskforce spearheaded by the Office of the prime Minister. In this regard, civil society led by the Uganda National NGO Forum has been holding a series of virtual meetings in an effort to contribute to the government cause to respond to Corona Virus Pandemic in Uganda. In the first engagement, civil Society pledged to support the government by offering expertise in the areas of emergency response, return to normality and impact mitigation and the post Covid 19 development phase. As a result, the Office of the Prime Minister requested CSOs to have a comprehensive CSO response plan.

In response to the formation of a comprehensive CSO response plan, actions so far taken include a matrix sent to all civil society organisations detailing the mode of response as an institution at all levels, Development of the CSO Thematic Response notes to guide the operation of thematic groups (Emergency Response Team, Advocacy and Policy Engagement Team, Citizen Engagement Team; and Coordination and Representation Team),  a call to volunteer to be part of these thematic groups is out; and apart from being represented on the National Technical Taskforce,- efforts to have civil society represented on other taskforces such as Health are underway; lastly, a call to establish a CSO Covid fund is also out with bank details and mobile money contacts for all well-wishers to make a contribution to ensure that the Covid 19 situation in the country is managed.

Don’t forget to fill in the Matrix shared here.  

#StandwithUganda: The details of the account and mobile money for the CSO Fund are: 

Bank Account Details

Account Name: Uganda National NGO Forum

Account Number: 0108212045101

Bank: Standard Chartered Bank Uganda Limited

Branch: Forest Mall

Mobile Number Details

Number: 0782 – 142551

Registered Name: Rashidah Namatovu

#StaySafe

Consolidated Efforts Need “the will” – African Regional Conference on Localisation of Aid

In the recent past, there has been growing recognition for the need to empower local communities and organizations to effectively respond to humanitarian needs. Nevertheless, significant portions of humanitarian financing remains channeled to International NGOs leaving local communities and organizations inadequately funded. Despite commitments to reinforce local and national capacities, data reported to UN Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) Financial   Tracking Service shows that only 2% of international humanitarian assistance in 2016 went directly to local and national responders, and national and local Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) received just 0.3% directly (Global Humanitarian Assistance Report 2017 Page 9). 

At the World Humanitarian Summit, held in May 2016 UN Secretary General laid out his vision in his report One Humanity: Shared Responsibility and its annex, the Agenda for Humanity and called upon the international community to put local response at the heart of humanitarian efforts. The summit also triggered Charter for Change that sets a specific target of 20% of humanitarian funding to be passed to southern-based NGOs by May 2018. The Grand Bargain (GB), another major outcome of the summit, seeks to make emergency aid finance more efficient and effective, committing to “a global, aggregated target of at Least 25% of humanitarian funding to local and national responders as directly as possible” and principled humanitarian action as local as possible and as international as necessary.

Since 2016, significant efforts have been undertaken at the international, national and local level by the Grand Bargain signatories to achieve the goal of providing more support and funding tools for local and national responders (Workstream 2) to realise the Grand Bargain commitments, however this seems to have fallen on unprepared ground hence taking long to germinate most especially by local actors. 

As such; as co-conveners of the localization workstream (a network of major donors, UN agencies, international non-governmental organizations and the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement), on 15-16 July 2019, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and the Government of Switzerland convened over 100 delegates from all over Africa to discuss on how the already existing efforts can be harmonized to bring about more significant changes at system, strategic and operational levels.

Addressing the participants, the Head of the AU’s Division on Humanitarian Affairs, Refugees and Displaced Persons, in the department of Political Affairs, Amb. Olabisi Dare highlighted that, localization of aid should aim at increasing the quantum of funding that reaches national actors including Community actors; and more importantly enhance the capacity development of the national and Community actors to effectively govern overall humanitarian assistance.

Eve Amez-Droz, Deputy Head of International Cooperation, Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation in Ethiopia, said: “A localised approach to aid has many benefits. It improves local ownership and awareness of aid, promotes its relevance, and allows for a more inclusive response, integrating the participation of affected people.”

Among the agreed on key priorities to accelerate the localization agenda in Africa included greater and meaningful representation of local actors in humanitarian decision making bodies, more investment in local institutional capacities to ensure systems, mechanisms and necessary policies are in place to harness accountability and transparency; and more targeted humanitarian support for women-led organizations to address issues pertaining women holistically such as women leadership, economic empowerment and norm changes due to changes in contexts. They also highlighted the need for governments to support the development of their own civil society responders; to develop domestic laws and policies to facilitate and regulate international response; and to seize the opportunity of the African Union’s new Humanitarian Agency, which will soon be established.

By Clare Kyasiimire

Contingency or Disaster Preparedness Fund; What strategy should Uganda Adopt?

“We cannot resurrect people with money; financing should be before and not after the disaster…” Hon. Martin Owor, Commissioner Department of Relief, Disaster Preparedness and Management Office of the Prime Minister during the dialogue

Defining the word contingency will direct you to a common understanding as a future event or circumstance which is possible but cannot be predicted with certainty. The topic of having a contingency fund to respond to emergencies, most especially disasters, has been the same talk year in year, out landing on seemingly deaf ears.

The 2016 World Disasters Report indicates that a total of 1,244 people were killed by disasters between the period 2006 and 2015 in Uganda. Over the same period, 4,345,797 people were affected by disasters, representing an 11% increase from the number of those affected in the preceding reference period of 1993 – 2005.

Supported by OXFAM, on 24th October 2018, the Civil Society Budget Advocacy Group (CSBAG) in partnership with the Humanitarian platform for Local and National Organizations in Uganda held a dialogue that sought to create space to have an in-depth discussion on the issue of Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation and Prevention in Uganda. Who is not playing their role and what is the way forward, is it lack of political will or coordination issue amongst government Ministries, Agencies and Departments, Should the government empower the Uganda Red Cross Society to coordinate disaster related interventions. This dialogue attracted over 50 participants who included Members of Parliament, OPM, Local Government officials, Civil Society Organizations, Academia and Media

“If we agree and are on the same page at level of identifying the problem, we will get to the solution and implement it on the same page, George Francis Iwa, Chairperson Humanitarian Platform in his remarks during the dialogue”

The Commissioner, Hon. Martin Owor, informed participants that much as the government is mandated to finance these disasters, citizens at the individual level should take precautionary measures, report any unusual signs or risks in their areas. He however decried the manner in which the government responds to disaster issues. He said that the Office of the Prime Minister has done their part, the team has carried out hazard mapping and profiling and completed the resettlement plan together with experts, however the Ministry of Finance, Planning and Development is not releasing funds to implement this plan,

this year we have had 66 landslides in Uganda and next year in June, we will have more landslides in Bududa according to the meteorologists, so the government should be working out this financing issue today, Deputy CAO Bududa district, at the dialogue”.

Is it absence of frameworks or lack of harmonization which has created a gap in the implementation?

The National Policy for Disaster Preparedness and Management designates the Department of disaster Preparedness and Management under the Office of Prime Minister as the lead agency responsible for disaster preparedness and management. However, while the department coordinates all the MDAs in the DRR sector, mitigation and prevention is primarily undertaken by other MDAs in the DRR sector which has implications on the financing of disaster preparedness, prevention and mitigation.

The limited funding or lack thereof at Local Government level directed towards disaster management, preparedness and prevention renders the implementation of the District Contingency Plans highly improbable.

The Public Finance Management Act (PFMA) establishes a Contingencies Fund in section 26. The Contingencies Fund make provision for the allocation of funds where urgent and unforeseen needs have arisen and it is in the public interest that funds should be provided to meet the need. From the above it can thus be argued that the PFMA, through the Contingencies Fund makes ample provision for funds in the event of a disaster occurring. Section 26, however, is silent on the use of the Fund for disaster risk reduction purposes. This is one area which might need more attention in a new disaster risk reduction and management bill.

What are the recommendations participants raised

“The government must be at the centre of this process, then other stakeholders complement. Hon. Lyandro Komakech, Parliamentary Forum on Disaster Risk Reduction, in his closing remarks”

As the discussions heated up raising emotions, a number of suggestions were brought to table for all stakeholders as mentioned in the Sendai Framework to which the government of Uganda is signatory, to rise and walk the talk. The government to ensure that the contingency fund is visible, tangible and accessible to mitigate disaster risks; the private sector to get involved because at the end of the day these disasters affect the economic performance of the country, Civil Society Organisations to contribute to the knowledge base, support public awareness and lead on advocacy, put pressure on decision makers to play their role , the government to domesticate the Kampala Convention formerly the African Union Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa and lastly citizens to respect the laws that govern nature.

“If you don’t belong to the river then don’t be in the river; if you don’t belong to the swamp then don’t live in the swamp”.

Story by Clare Kyasiimire

COVID-19 Response in Rhino Camp Refugee Settlement

Uganda is currently home to more than 1,310,000 refugees, of whom approximately 835,000 come from South Sudan, 365,000 from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), and the remainder from other countries. The Rhino Camp Refugee Settlement divided into six zones between of  Ocea, Siripi, Eden, Tika, Odubu, and Ofua hosts an estimated population of 86,975 as of June 2017 statistics representing 22,983 households with 17% of this population representing the host community. 80.6% South Sudanese, 17.7% Ugandan citizens, and 1.7% other nationalities

With the prevalence of Covid-19 pandemic around the world, it is no doubt that such areas as refugee camps and settlements are high risk areas. In response to the situation refugee led organisations have come together to ensure that the community takes full preventive measures in accordance to the Ministry of Health guidelines. This has been done through the 3 months Refugee Emergency Response on COVID-19 Project by the Youth Social Advocacy Team (YSAT).

The 3 months’ project is aimed at enhancing Risk Communication, Community Engagement & Infection prevention and control in combating COVID-19 by addressing KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE and PRACTICE of refugees and host communities as they respond to the pandemic. Some of the activities so far done is conducting road drive public system communication to sensitise communities about Covid-19, Installation of 90 Handwashing stations in communal centers in Rhino Camp, Provision of Airtime credit to refugees leaders to be able to communicate any emergencies, Distribution of soap through door to door using Village Health Teams and disseminating translated IEC materials languages used in the Rhino Camp Refugee Settlement.

John Jal Dak

Youth Social Advocacy Team (YSAT) 

COVID-19 Response in Rhino Camp Refugee Settlement

Uganda is currently home to more than 1,310,000 refugees, of whom approximately 835,000 come from South Sudan, 365,000 from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), and the remainder from other countries. The Rhino Camp Refugee Settlement divided into six zones between of  Ocea, Siripi, Eden, Tika, Odubu, and Ofua hosts an estimated population of 86,975 as of June 2017 statistics representing 22,983 households with 17% of this population representing the host community. 80.6% South Sudanese, 17.7% Ugandan citizens, and 1.7% other nationalities

With the prevalence of Covid-19 pandemic around the world, it is no doubt that such areas as refugee camps and settlements are high risk areas. In response to the situation refugee led organisations have come together to ensure that the community takes full preventive measures in accordance to the Ministry of Health guidelines. This has been done through the 3 months Refugee Emergency Response on COVID-19 Project by the Youth Social Advocacy Team (YSAT).

The 3 months’ project is aimed at enhancing Risk Communication, Community Engagement & Infection prevention and control in combating COVID-19 by addressing KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE and PRACTICE of refugees and host communities as they respond to the pandemic. Some of the activities so far done is conducting road drive public system communication to sensitise communities about Covid-19, Installation of 90 Handwashing stations in communal centers in Rhino Camp, Provision of Airtime credit to refugees leaders to be able to communicate any emergencies, Distribution of soap through door to door using Village Health Teams and disseminating translated IEC materials languages used in the Rhino Camp Refugee Settlement.

John Jal Dak

Youth Social Advocacy Team (YSAT) 

From 4 to 14 – New Regional Hubs to Deliver UNNGOF Programmes

Growth is inevitable. It is also a sure sign of the healthiness of any entity.

After a comprehensive organization assessment of UNNGOF in 2018 highlighting the Institutional strengths and gaps for an effective platform, a 3 year partnership was signed with DGF, CSO Resilience, Health, and Healing. Back to the basics and connecting with Citizens. Key among its undertakings was the comprehensive organization assessment for the 35 district networks which took place between 2nd -10th September 2019.

As a key outcome of this process, 14 Regional Advocacy hubs were identified and will work as special purpose vehicles to support and coordinate all sub-national engagements. A feedback meeting for all 35 partners of SPAN was organized on 18th October 2019 at Esella Hotel for a total of 74 participants, each District Network represented by a Coordinator and a Chairperson of the Board. The meeting not only provided an opportunity to share findings of the assessment and announce and orient the 14 new Regional Hubs, but was also an opportunity for capacity building sessions where topics like QuAM, financial systems, communication were covered.

Mr. Richard Ssewakiryanga, Executive Director UNNGOF, announced that the new regional hubs model would enhance UNNGOF’s ability to effectively coordinate CSOs at sub national level but also would facilitate the regional advocacy agenda. The hubs will continue working with other existing district networks.

The 14 new regional Hubs include;

Gulu NGO Forum – Acholi region

Lira NGO Forum – Lango region

Arua District NGO Network – West Nile region

Pallisa CSO Network – Bukedi region

Kanungu NGOs/CBOs Forum – Kigezi region

Kiboga NGO Forum – Buganda region

Namutumba NGO Forum – Busoga region

Kabarole NGO/CBO Association – Toro region

Kitara CSO Network – Bunyoro region

RIAM RIAM CSO Network – Karamoja region

Kapchorwa CSO Alliance – Sebei region

Amuria CSO Network – Teso region

Ankole and Bugisu region identification of hubs was deferred to a later date

Background

Over the years, UNNGOF has invested in building a sub national CSO infrastructure. In 2006-2011, the National District Networks Support Programme (NDNSP) was implemented, giving birth to 25 District Networks across the country. Having built strong district networks over 5 years, the programme rolled over into Support Programme for Advocacy Networks (SPAN) with 35 District Networks (DNs). These 35 DNs, under the leadership of 4 Regional Hubs, were to work as green houses for local democracy and interlocutors between citizens and the local governments and central government.

The networks have remained central in mobilizing and sensitizing citizens on their roles and responsibilities in nation building; social and political accountability have been strengthened through the district networks. However a number of challenges, including the dwindling finances to sub national partners and poor governance have largely affected the operations and relevance of district networks.

The 35 District Networks of SPAN are:

Kiboga NGO Forum, Kalangala District NGO Forum, Luweero District NGO Forum, Namutumba NGO Forum, Kibaale CSO Network, Bugiri NGO Forum, Mukono NGO Forum and Kamuli NGO Forum. Tororo Civil Society Network, Kapchorwa CSO Alliance, Pallisa CSO Network, Bugisu CSO Network, Kumi Network of Development Organizations, Riam Riam CSO Network, Sironko NGO Forum and Kotido NGO Forum. Lira NGO Forum, Kaberamaido District Network, Nebbi District NGO Forum, Pader NGO Forum, Katakwi District Development Actors Network, Kitgum NGO Forum, Moyo District NGO Forum, Kitgum NGO Form, Amuria CSO Network and Arua NGO Forum. Western Ankole Civil society Forum, Kisoro NGO Forum, Kamwenge District Indigenous Voluntary Development Organisation (KADIVDO), Kamwenge District Voluntary Development Organizations Network, Kanungu NGO/CBO Forum, Kabarole NGO/CBO Association, Kyenjojo NGO Forum, Mbarara NGO Forum, Kasese District Development Network.

By Robert Ninyesiga

Humanitarian Platform to Mark One Year

It is such an important milestone to mark in the humanitarian sector in Uganda, most especially the local and national organisations celebrating the first year of working together as a collective. The Humanitarian Platform was launched on 7th March 2018 by the Minister of Disaster Preparedness Relief and Refugees, Hon. Eng Hilary Onek. The platform has within a relatively short time registered imperative footsteps with the guidance of a passionate and committed steering committee. The Humanitarian Platform Steering Committee includes, CAFOMI, DRT, InterAid Uganda, LIPRO Uganda, Uganda Red Cross Society, TPO Uganda, Legal Aid Clinic, DENIVA, CEFORD, URDMC, AWYAD, OXFAM Uganda and Uganda National NGO Forum.

On 5th December 2018, the platform held the end of year steering committee meeting to reflect, take note of the challenges, consolidate key lessons and look out for opportunities to strengthen the platform. During this meeting, the platform committee was privileged to host Anna Maria Leichtfried, Lezlie Velez and Michael Nabugere, all from the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF) Secretariat, Office of the Prime Minister.  The team presented the CRRF roadmap which was launched in 2017 and adopted in January 2018 during the 2nd CRRF steering committee meeting as one of the opportunities the platform can tap into to influence the humanitarian agenda. Most importantly, this was to begin a fundamental conversation between the CRRF secretariat and the Humanitarian Platform; understanding the role of the local and national organisations in the CRRF roadmap 2018/2020; and ensuring that the efforts of the local and national organisations are strategically intentional to Humanitarian response.

During the steering committee meeting, members also agreed that the platform further describes its structure more strategically and where it’s heading not forgetting the exit strategy by putting into place a proper strategic plan. The platform to step up and engage in policy development and advocacy, but most importantly to prove intentional relevancy and point of reference in the humanitarian sector and as a point of reference

Story by Clare Kyasiimire

Parliament Applauds Civil Society for a Well Thought-Out Electoral Reform Proposals

In the early hours of 11th September 2019, Civil Society Organizations in Uganda, led by the Uganda National NGO Forum (UNNGOF) and the Citizens’ Coalition for Electoral Democracy (CCEDU) appeared before the Legal and Parliamentary Affairs Committee of Parliament to present their proposals and analysis of Election Related Bills tabled by the Attorney General on the 26th July 2019.

This follows a series of activities, including; a Comprehensive Analysis of the Five (5) Bills before parliament, Nationwide Stakeholder Consultations on the Bills and a review of various stakeholder proposals including the Supreme Court Recommendations in Presidential Election Petition No. 1 of 2016; the Domestic and International Election Observers’ Reports; the Citizens’ Compact for Free and Fair Elections; the Citizens’ Electoral Reform Agenda; Private and the African Charter on Democracy, Elections and Governance.

Before Parliament, CSO Representatives foregrounded the fact that their proposals are related and informed by what civil society have championed for a long time in the crusade for Free and Fair Elections and continue to do so in the quest for a positive democratic path for Uganda.

It is imperative to recall that, since the promulgation of its Constitution on October 8, 1995, Uganda has held five successive national elections (1996, 2001, 2006, 2011 and 2016) within the set Constitutional timeframes. However, since 2001, general elections in Uganda have ended in controversy. The 2001, 2006 and 2016 Presidential elections culminated in Court disputes while in 2011, the election ended in public demonstrations (walk-to-work protests). Through the three (3) Presidential petitions of 2001, 2006, and 2016, and numerous Parliamentary petitions, Courts have consistently held that our elections fall short of set out standards in the Constitution. Concerns about Government’s commitment towards a transparent and accountable electoral framework persist, owing to the lukewarm response to calls from election observers, political organizations, civil society organizations, and other independent observers.

It is against this background that civil society actors believe that without meaningful reforms, it would be meaningless for Ugandan’s to participate in the 2021 General Elections. As such, while the civil society believes that the five (5) electoral reform Bills are a step in the right direction, deeper analysis reveals that they do not suggest any significant shift from the status quo and cannot guarantee that Uganda will attain free and fair elections in their current form. This calls for parliament to look beyond the Bills and inquire into all stakeholders’ recommendations.

On their part, the Members of Parliament on the committee welcomed civil society recommendations and applauded the team for an excellent analysis of the Bills conducted. “This is by far the most comprehensive and professionally done analysis of the Bills that has been shared with the committee so far and we thank you – Civil Society for this.” Hon. Abdul Kantuntu, Member of the Committee. The chairperson of the committee also applauded the CSOs for presenting very comprehensive and well ‘thought-out’ proposals and promised to debate and consider every single proposal on its merits.

This intervention is part of the continued civil society advocacy campaign for a credible election management system undergirded by an impartial and independent Electoral Commission, a Credible Voters’ Register, reduction of the use of money in elections, prohibition of use of public resources for private political gain, regulating the role of the army and other public officers in partisan political activities, and the entrenchment of the principal of separation of powers, among others. CSO leaders promised to continue these efforts by mobilizing and organizing Ugandans to demand of their representatives to enact meaningful reforms and implored parliament to enact laws that promote constitutional governance in Uganda and guarantee free, fair and credible elections.

For more on this, please visit the links below:

Message to the Public on Electoral Reforms

CSO Analysis on Electoral Reform Bill

Citizen Memorandum to MPs

Story By Chris Nkwatsibwe